Anifilm

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Dimensions of 3D Animation

Inside Out

Ronnie Del Carmen, Pete Docter | United States | 2015 | 102 min

Inside Out

Tu 01/05/2018
21.00-22.42
Masaryk Square

Dimensions of 3D Animation: Milestones

různí / various | 78 min

Pinpointing certain films as milestones is always very tricky. In
the case of 3D computer animation with more than 30 years
of history and a very rich palette of used approaches, it is even
more so. We logically focused on its first successes that brought
fame to 3D animation and to a certain extent defined its present
form. We are talking not only about the first films made by Pixar,
but also about more avant-garde examples such as
The Little Death
by Symbolics Graphics or the cult beginnings of the famous
squirrel by Blue Sky Studios.
The selection also focuses on original authorial films, well-
-known as well as less-known. Films that at their time celebrated
incredible success on the international festival scene. And films
whose authors’ approach to the technique strongly influenced
its perception by the sceptical artistic community. With regards
to visual effects, we included
Dix by The Mill and the legendary
Oscar-winning
Logorama told entirely through the use of more
than 2,500 logos. We naturally can’t forget Rosto, one of 3D CGI’s
tireless visionaries (much like our jury member Chris Landreth
who will present his complete retrospective at this year’s Anifilm)
and David O’Reilly whose films (and games) are also included
in this year’s programme. We also included the famous British
film
Morning Stroll by AKA and the disturbing film I, Pet Goat II by
Canadian studio Helifant.

The Little Death
Directed by Matt Elson, USA, 1984, 2 min

Luxo Jr.
Directed by John Lasseter, USA, 1986, 2 min

Geri’s Game
Directed by Jan Pinkava, USA, 1997, 5 min

Dix
Directed by Jules Janaud, Fabrice Le Nezet,
Francois Roisin – aka Bif, FR, 2008, 7 min

Logorama
Directed by François Alaux, Hervé de Crécy,
Ludovic Houplain, FR, 2009, 16 min

Splintertime
Directed by Rosto, FR, NL, BEL, 2014, 10 min

Morning Stroll
Directed by Grant Orchard, UK, 2011, 7 min

I, Pet Goat II
Directed by Louis Lefebvre, CA, 2012, 8 min

Gone Nutty
Directed by Carlos Saldanha, USA, 2002, 4 min

The External World
Directed by David O’Reilly, DE, IR, 2011, 17 min
Dimensions of 3D Animation: Milestones

We 02/05/2018
12.00-13.18
free seats: 94
Světozor Cinema

Fr 04/05/2018
12.00-13.18
free seats: 76
Světozor Cinema

Dimensions of 3D animation: Game and Other Influences

různí / various | 78 min

In this programme block we focus on films that can’t deny
various non-film influences. Their authors often drew inspiration
from the aesthetics and narration of computer games. And not
only thanks to the fact that they sometimes develop them – like
for instance David O’Reilly. His game and film
Everything competes
both at film and game festivals. Computer games are a natural
source of inspiration because – like the explored technique –
they are created inside a computing machine. The retro aesthetic
of the first computer games then forms a world for itself in
pop-culture (
Pixels). The world of visual effects is a huge market
for 3D animation. The principle of combination with the real
world is an attraction that – it seems – will not leave mainstream
or independent production any time soon. We can see it in
Robot
and Scarecrow
. Visualisation of science experiments, footage from
digital microscopes and laboratory simulations (
Macrostructure)
are also very popular. Like all other media, 3D animation also has
other sources of inspiration. And so we can for instance admire the
3D version of the comic book
The Absence of Eddy Table. Join us in
our search for other influences.

Dilemma
Directed by John Halas, UK, 1981, 11 min

Robot and Scarecrow
Directed by Kibwe Tavares, UK, 2017, 15 min

Rainbow Narcosis
Directed by Jonathan Monaghan, USA 2013, 8 min

Everything
Directed by David O’Reilly, USA, IR, 2017, 11 min

Between Bears
Directed by Eran Hilleli, IZR, 2010, 5 min

Macrostructure
Directed by Eric Schockmel, UK, 2014, 5 min

Pixels
Directed by Patrick Jean, FR, 2009, 3 min

The Absence of Eddy Table
Directed by Rune Spaans, NOR, 2016, 12 min

Let’s Play Nomad X
Directed by Kristian Andrews, UK, 2013, 3 min

Google Spotlight Stories: Son of Jaguar
Directed by Jorge Gutiérrez, USA, 2017, 11 min

La Luna
Directed by Enrico Casarosa, USA, 2011, 7 min
Dimensions of 3D animation: Game and Other Influences

We 02/05/2018
14.30-15.48
free seats: 110
Cinema Aurora

Fr 04/05/2018
21.30-22.48
free seats: 56
Puppet Theatre

Rango

Gore Verbinski | United States | 2011 | 103 min

Rango

We 02/05/2018
16.30-18.13
Roháč - ČT Hall

Zootopia

Byron Howard, Rich Moore | United States | 2016 | 109 min | CS

Zootopia

Th 03/05/2018
11.30-13.19
free seats: 102
Cinema Aurora

Dimensions of 3D Animation: 2D versus 3D

různí / various | 70 min

As its very name suggests, 3D-CG animation artists create 3D
objects, placing them in 3D space. As the novelty of 3D-CG has
worn off, it has become something with which to experiment,
challenge and push against. Sampling the ingenious ways
animators combine 2D and 3D, the screening opens with the 2D
bodies of
Day and Night acting as windows into their 3D environments. Across the selection, we see 2D figures inhabit 3D spaces
(in
Dark Noir a 3D PI in a 3D world searches out 2D daemons,
while stop-motion paper 2D dogs and cats chase around in the
3D spaces of
My Happy End). A 3D Death and a duck traverse the
2D world of
Duck, Death and the Tulip and combinations of 2D/3D
software create hybrid spaces and figures (
Paperman and Paths
of Hate
with its the 3D graphics rendered in a comic book look).
Motion-captured bodies inhabit 3D spaces inspired by WWI
photographs in Ghosts, and in
Mamoon, a 3D figure created in
Maya is projected into a live-action polystyrene space.
Five Years
Older
– the City and Mountain Castle Mountain Flower Plastic use
a more experimental style to fuse 2D drawing with 3D elements.
Finally,
Blissful Accidental Death takes a mixed media approach,
bringing together drawings on paper and animated objects with
2D and 3D CG animation.

Day and Night
Directed by Teddy Newton, USA, 2010, 6 min

Dark Noir
Directed by Rafael Grampá, USA, 2014, 4 min

Paths of Hate
Directed by Damian Nenow, Poland, 2010, 11 min

Duck, Death and the Tulip
Directed by Jorge Sandoval, Ella Yoon, USA, 2018, 6 min

Five Years Older: The City
Directed by Dirk Koy, CH, 2012, 4 min

My Happy End
Directed by Milen Vitanov, GER, 2007, 5 min

Mountain Castle Mountain Flower Plastic
Directed by Annapurna Kumar, USA, 2017, 4 min

Mamoon
Directed by Ben Steer, UK, 2017, 7 min

Ghosts
Directed by Simon McKeown, UK, 2014, 3 min

Paperman
Directed by John Kahrs, USA, 2012, 7 min

Blissful Accidental Death
Directed by Sergiu Negulici, ROU, 2017, 15 min
Dimensions of 3D Animation: 2D versus 3D

Th 03/05/2018
15.30-16.40
free seats: 44
Puppet Theatre

Sa 05/05/2018
12.00-13.10
free seats: 50
Puppet Theatre

Dimension of 3D Animation: Lighting

různí / various | 74 min

No matter whether we are looking at animation or live-action,
lighting is fundamental. Animation, including 3D-CG, has the
advantage of drawing on two traditions: cinema and animation.
The opening and closing animations in this strand / programme
push these influences to their extremes. Our opener
Garden
Party
gives pond life a hyper-real dimension through a photoreal
aesthetic. As a direct contrast, in
Please Say Something, artificiality
is at the fore. In very different ways, these two animations control
and shape both light and shadows, developing the tonal shifts
of a character and their story-world, and also adding to a scene’s
composition. Between these opposites are animations following
the same impulse and whose lighting strategies combine photoreal lighting with a stop-motion look (
Perfect Houseguest), highly
textured CG models (
Song of Toad) or a cartoon style (Blik and 366
Tage
), while Pure White plays on the contrast between a photorealistic and slightly damaged CG anatomical model and its pure
surrounds. With
Red Rabbit, different lighting schemes emphasise
the hopes and fears of the central protagonist, and for
Good Vibrations, lighting emphasises the glass shield of the building that the
characters must step beyond. More experimental examples include
Feast, a colour test of Disney’s software Meander and their renderer
Hyperion;
Light Motif offers a meditation on the absorptive and
reflective surfaces of fur, spheres and flat surfaces; and
None uses
volumetric lighting to heighten the shadowy atmosphere of a fog-
-covered cityscape.

Garden Party
Directed by Florian Babikian, Vincent Bayoux, Victor Caire, Théophile Dufresne, Gabriel Grapperon, Lucas Navarro, FR, 2016, 7 min

366 Days/ 366 Tage
Directed by Johannes Schiehsl, GER, 2011, 12 min

Red Rabbit
Directed by Egmont Mayer, GER, 2007, 8 min

Pure White
Directed by Windszus Sven, GER, 2018, 3 min

Perfect Houseguest
Directed by Ru Kuwahata, Max Porter, FR, 2015, 2 min

None
Directed by Ash Thorp, USA, 2017, 3 min

Song of a Toad
Directed by Kariem Saleh, GER, 2017, 7 min

Blik
Directed by Bastiaan Schravendeel, NDL, 2010, 8 min

Light Motif
Directed by Frédéric Bonpapa, UK/FR, 2014, 4 min

Feast
Directed by Patrick Osborne, USA, 2014, 6 min

Please Say Something
Directed by David O‘Reilly, GER/IR, 2008, 10 min
Dimension of 3D Animation: Lighting

Th 03/05/2018
17.30-18.44
free seats: 106
Cinema Aurora

Sa 05/05/2018
15.00-16.14
free seats: 221
J. K. Tyl Theatre

Dimensions of 3D Animations: Textures

různí / various | 75 min

Beautifully designed models along with expressive movements
and gestures are only part of the visual appeal of 3D-CG animation. The surface textures of figures and objects are also key to
its craft. Using texture mapping or shaders, artists add details to
the surfaces of models, which combined with lighting decisions,
create nuanced shifts in a character’s appearance and surroundings as they undergo the journeys of their individual story.
Our selected line-up includes works exploiting the details and
reflective properties of metallic surfaces in the bronze god-figure
of
God and the weathered ‘Petramosuarus Cavator’ figures of Age
of Rust
. Several use distinctive cross-hatched textures to heighten
our insight into a character experience, with
The Bellies, L’ère bête
and The Head Vanishes using subtle changes in shading to convey
facets of character experience.
Heart, too, uses shading to depict
registers of its abstracted characters within a limited palette of
colours. Taking abstraction further,
Surface Detail is a kaleidoscope of iterative polygonal surface transformations. Working with
quite different styles, textures evoke the sci-fi aesthetic of the
CG/stop-motion Ark and the painterly look essential to the tone
of
The Lost Thing.

God
Directed by Konstantin Bronzit, RU, 2003, 4 min

The Bellies / Les ventres
Directed by Philippe Grammaticopoulos, FR, 2009, 15 min

Surface Detail
Directed by Tom Beddard, UK, 2011, 3 min

Age of Rust
Directed by Francesco Aber, Alessandro Mattei, ITA, 2014, 7 min

L‘ère bête
Directed by Thomas Caudron, Ingrid Menet, Clément Tissier, Laurent
Meriaux, FR, 2011, 7 min

Heart
Directed by Erick Oh, USA, Jižní Korea, 8 min

The Head Vanishes / Une tête disparaît
Directed by Franck Dion, CAN/FR, 2016, 9 min

Arka / Ark
Directed by Grzegorz Jonkajtys, PL, 2007, 7 min

The Lost Thing
Directed by Andrew Ruhemann, Shaun Tan, AU/UK, 2010, 15 min
Dimensions of 3D Animations: Textures

Th 03/05/2018
19.00-20.15
free seats: 232
J. K. Tyl Theatre

Sa 05/05/2018
18.30-19.45
free seats: 227
J. K. Tyl Theatre

Dimensions of 3D Animation: Movement

různí / various | 75 min

It took 3D computer animation some time to achieve such a
fluidity of motion that the viewers would believe it and accept
it as natural. It was a tradition (now hopefully gone) that each
new Pixar film was accompanied by a campaign promoting how
the authors once again managed to improve the lifelikeness of
the movement of hair, feathers and other problematic textures.
Apart from Pixar’s bird films separated by 16 years and thus
showing the desired improvements, we have also included entirely different films. More experimental films that explore movement from other perspectives than realism. In a number of films
we can admire abstract dancing – movement of 3D artefacts
(
Spin, geist.xyz, Oscillate). We can also see 3D animation used in
simulation of unobservable movement or music tones transformed into “materialised” movement (
Nebula, e:e:e:e:e, 20Hz).
Procedural animation takes movement as its most elementary
quality. Since the beginning of animation, it requires extreme
prowess to animate walking. This is humorously addressed in
Walking City. The Platige studio and its main representative Tomek Bagiński are also included in our selection. With the quality
of their 3D animation, this famous Polish studio could compete
with big American companies. But we can’t avoid birds even in
non-Pixar films. The unusual protagonists of the successful film
Flamingo Pride are flamingos.

For the Birds
Directed by Ralph Eggleston, USA, 2000, 4 min

Walking City
Directed by Matt Pyke, UK, 2014, 8 min

Spin
Directed by Max Hattler, UK, 2010, 4 min

Padlé umění / Fallen Art
Directed by Tomek Baginski, PL, 2004, 6 min

Ghost Cell
Directed by Antoine Delacharlery, FR, 2015, 6 min

geist.xyz
Directed by Zeitgeist, DE, 2016, 2 min

Lou
Directed by Dave Mullins, USA, 2017, 7 min

Nebula
Directed by Marcin Nowrotek, PL, 2017, 4 min

e:e:e:e:e
Directed by Brandon Blommaert, CA, 2015, 3 min

Unnamed Soundsculpture
Directed by Daniel Franke, Cedric Kiefer, DE, 2012, 5 min

20Hz
Directed by Ruth Jarman, Joe Gerhardt, UK, 2011, 5 min

Pivot
Directed by André Bergs, NL, 2009, 5 min

Flamingo Pride
Directed by Tomer Eshed, DE, 2011, 6 min

Oscillate
Directed by Daniel Sierra, USA, 2013, 4 min

Piper
Directed by Alan Barillaro, USA, 2016, 6 min
Dimensions of 3D Animation: Movement

Fr 04/05/2018
14.30-15.45
free seats: 238
J. K. Tyl Theatre

Su 06/05/2018
12.00-13.15
free seats: 218
J. K. Tyl Theatre

The Lego Movie

Phil Lord, Christopher Miller | United States, Denmark, Australia | 2014 | 100 min

Who hasn’t played with Lego, raise your hand. Do not get fooled, though, this film isn’t a commercial, it is a very entertaining, dynamic and adventurous 3D comedy starring a Lego minifigure and the iconic construction toy itself. After their successful and admittedly original family film Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs (2009), directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller reconvened to create a box-office hit. Their original script follows a construction worker named Emmet. He is a perfectly ordinary LEGO man obeying the rules and instructions who happens to find himself among rebels striving to overthrow the evil Lord Business and who accidentally think Emmet is the prophesised Special. Shy and clumsy Emmet, desperately unprepared for taking on the role of the Special, eventually stops resisting it and sets out to save the world.
This straightforward story about friendship, unity and in particular free will has a deeper meaning. You may shiver a bit spotting references to oppression and Orwellian and our real world. And when Emmet finds himself in the human world, the film combines live-action and animated scenes.

The Lego Movie

Fr 04/05/2018
17.30-19.10
free seats: 94
Cinema Aurora